Northern Dragon

… life in the twilight years of modern-day democracy …

Tag Archive for ‘inequality’

Binding the Beast

In 1776 the Scottish economist and philosopher, Adam Smith, released his magnum opus, “The Wealth of Nations” and laid the foundation for classical economic theory – and modern Capitalism. The world at that time was significantly simpler in many ways than it is today, and our knowledge of economics, sociology, and politics has advanced considerably since then. But underneath all of our modern-day complexity, the economic foundation is the same: […]

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The Essays

I have published two essays here on my blog; a compilation of my present posts for those of you who may be interested in longer texts – and in reading my posts in sequence: “The Shape of Reality” and “The Sickness Within” They do not contain new material, apart from a small preamble, but seeing the whole thing as a coherent and logical argument may be both useful and interesting. […]

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The Sickness Within

“Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell.” — Edward Abbey, American author and essayist There is a sickness within capitalism. It is endemic, part of the system, and thus very difficult to fix. It is also largely ignored these days, except when it manifests in its most blatant and symptomatic form: monopolies. Monopolies, however, are only a symptom. The underlying disease is quite different […]

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The Price of Democracy

Democracy was invented by the Greeks. But their philosophers had very grave doubts about it and generally did not believe that it could be brought to work. Socrates explained it like this: Imagine an election between two candidates: a doctor and a sweet shop owner. The sweet shop owner would say of his rival:“Look, this person here has worked many evils on you. He hurts you, gives you bitter potions […]

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The Numbers Game

Democracy is a numbers game. The rules are as simple as they get: one person, one vote. It’s as basic as that. So it naturally follows that whichever faction has the most people, is the faction with the greatest power, yes? That was the conundrum which faced the major European powers in the years following the French Revolution. To ensure the stability of their lands – not to mention the […]

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